Marquis of Carabas

wonderful-strange:

You Can Survive Fallout From a Nuclear Attack. Cold War 4-H Display.

wonderful-strange:

You Can Survive Fallout From a Nuclear Attack. Cold War 4-H Display.

hierophage:

From Sun Ra’s course “Sun Ra 171”, in Afro-American Studies at UC Berkley in 1971. Sun Ra 171Reference ListAlbums1. My Brother the Wind, vols. 1 & 2 — Saturn2. The Night of the Purple Moon — Saturn3. The Magic City — Saturn4. The Nubians of Pluto — Saturn5. Atlantis — Saturn6. Fate in a Pleasant Mood — Saturn7. Monorails and Satellites — Saturn8. Strange Strings — Saturn9. Nothing Is — ESP Disc10. Heliocentric, vols. 1 & 2 — ESP DiscBooks: Title, Author, Publisher1. “Jazz Where it Came From, Where It’s At”, John S. Wilson United States Information Agency2. “Black Man of the Nile”, Yoseph Ben Jochannan Alkibu Ian Books3. “Stylus, 13:1” (Spring 1971), Temple University Student Pubications4. “Ark of Bones”, Henry Dumas5. “Poetry for My People”, Henry Dumas6. “Black Fire”, LeRoi Jones & Larry Neal7. “The Two Babylons”, Alexander Hislop8. “Missonary Travels”, Livingston9. “Radix”, Bill Looney10. “God Wills the Negro”, Theodore P. Ford11. “God’s Children”, Archibald Rutledge12. “Ruins of Empire”, Volney13. The Source Book of Man’s Life and Death (i.e, The Bible, “King James”), God, numerous14. “A New Model of the Universe”, P.D. Ouspensky15. “The Loom of Language”, Frederick Bodmer16. “Blackie’s Etymology” published in London, England

hierophage:

From Sun Ra’s course “Sun Ra 171”, in Afro-American Studies at UC Berkley in 1971. 

Sun Ra 171
Reference List

Albums
1. My Brother the Wind, vols. 1 & 2 — Saturn
2. The Night of the Purple Moon — Saturn
3. The Magic City — Saturn
4. The Nubians of Pluto — Saturn
5. Atlantis — Saturn
6. Fate in a Pleasant Mood — Saturn
7. Monorails and Satellites — Saturn
8. Strange Strings — Saturn
9. Nothing Is — ESP Disc
10. Heliocentric, vols. 1 & 2 — ESP Disc

Books: Title, Author, Publisher
1. “Jazz Where it Came From, Where It’s At”, John S. Wilson United States Information Agency
2. “Black Man of the Nile”, Yoseph Ben Jochannan Alkibu Ian Books
3. “Stylus, 13:1” (Spring 1971), Temple University Student Pubications
4. “Ark of Bones”, Henry Dumas
5. “Poetry for My People”, Henry Dumas
6. “Black Fire”, LeRoi Jones & Larry Neal
7. “The Two Babylons”, Alexander Hislop
8. “Missonary Travels”, Livingston
9. “Radix”, Bill Looney
10. “God Wills the Negro”, Theodore P. Ford
11. “God’s Children”, Archibald Rutledge
12. “Ruins of Empire”, Volney
13. The Source Book of Man’s Life and Death (i.e, The Bible, “King James”), God, numerous
14. “A New Model of the Universe”, P.D. Ouspensky
15. “The Loom of Language”, Frederick Bodmer
16. “Blackie’s Etymology” published in London, England

ana-insana:

Gustave Moreau (1826-1898) Young Moses

ana-insana:

Gustave Moreau (1826-1898)
Young Moses

deathandmysticism:

Trelawny, Hunt, and Byron at The Funeral of Shelley, Louis Édouard Fournier, 1889

deathandmysticism:

Trelawny, Hunt, and Byron at The Funeral of Shelley, Louis Édouard Fournier, 1889

sometimesinapril:

Recently acquired LP:
Richard & Linda Thompson — Pour Down Like Silver (1975)

Cynicism is the answer of the ruling culture to this kynical subversion: it recognizes, it takes into account, the particular interest behind the ideological universality, the distance between the ideological mask and the reality, but it still finds reasons to retain the mask. This cynicism is not a direct position of immorality, it is more like morality itself put in the service of immorality — the model of cynical wisdom is to conceive probity, integrity, as a supreme form of dishonesty, and morals as a supreme form of profligacy, the truth as the most effective form of a lie. This cynicism is therefore a kind of perverted ‘negation of the negation’ of the official ideology: confronted with illegal enrichment, with robbery, the cynical reaction consists in saying that legal enrichment is a lot more effective and, moreover, protected by the law. As Bertolt Brecht puts it in his Threepenny Opera: “what is the robbery of a bank compared to the founding of a new bank?”

Zizek, Slavoj. The Sublime Object of Ideology (London; New York: Verso, 1989).